Marketing in the Church: What Is True Evangelism?

How often do we as followers of Jesus market a building that is flawed, yet we claim it holds Jesus every week?

We always tell our friends, “I have the most amazing church. Everyone loves Jesus. You really should visit.”

“Our choir is just awesome. Please come and hear it sometime.”

“You know, the preschoolers are singing on Sunday morning. You should come and visit!”

This is the popular Christian idea of “evangelism”. We invite our friends to see our gigantic church building, our beautiful stained glass windows, our amazing choir, our kids’ service, our Mothers’ Day service, our Easter eggstravaganza (see what I did there?), our Christmas pageant, or our prayer tower that’s just gorgeous.

But do you catch what’s in common about all those things?

They all send someone back to a building that has flawed people and flawed doctrine in hopes that they will come to Jesus.

But in fact, it shows an unworthiness lie in the believer that they are not worthy to present Jesus, not the church.

Let me propose a new form of evangelism.

Perhaps we can all live like Jesus, love like Jesus, and show Jesus in our lives, not point everyone back to a qualified “pastor.”

Maybe we can share Him personally and directly with our friends, not out of obligation, but because we can’t stop.

Because we’re overflowing with His love, and His goodness, and Him – we can’t help but share it.

 

 

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3 thoughts on “Marketing in the Church: What Is True Evangelism?

  1. Amen!

    It seems to me that many churches, no doubt influenced by the commercialized mindset so prominent today, want numbers more than anything else. Thus, the gospel becomes secondary. Jesus becomes a product to be sold, rather than a Redeemer to be proclaimed. The gospel of reconciliation is ignored – exchanged for a gospel of life improvement. Discipleship is totally neglected, and if indeed there were any true converts from such ‘evangelism’, they are left to starve amidst an environment of pragmatic gimmicks and fluffy sermonettes that won’t even feed babes. And worse, many well meaning people don’t even realize they’re doing this.

    Yeah, we shouldn’t simply drag our unbelieving friends to the church, and hope people there do a good enough job.

    Nice to see new posts, btw! Keep ’em coming! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes! Awesome words there. You should write your own post on the subject, maybe for the blogging project 🙂 Your comment reminds me of something C.T. Studd would say, precisely this quote:

      “Yes, when? When indeed shall we see a real Church Militant here upon the earth? Christ’s call is to feed the hungry, not the full; to save the lost, not the stiff-necked; not to call the scoffers, but sinners to repentance; not to build and furnish comfortable chapels, churches, and cathedrals at home in which to rock Christian professors to sleep by means of clever essays, stereotyped prayers and artistic musical performances, but to raise living churches of souls among the destitute, to capture men from the devil’s clutches and snatch them from the very jaws of hell, to enlist and train them for Jesus, and make them into an Almighty Army of God. But this can only be accomplished by a red-hot, unconventional, unfettered Holy Ghost religion, where neither Church nor State, neither man nor traditions are worshipped or preached, but only Christ and Him crucified. Not to confess Christ by fancy collars, church steeples or rich embroidered altar-cloths, but by reckless sacrifice and heroism in the foremost trenches…”

      That’s really long, but really good 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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